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Thread: Stacking stock clutches to act like a lock-up

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    North Carolina
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    Someone told me that I could my stock clutch fibers and steels to lower my 60 ft time is that true or not

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    United States
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    146
    Don't understand the question.

    <DIV>The stock deal no matter the bike is to provide enough area fiber to steel to transmit the torque and not slip. Common first is heavier springs and rider to "slide" the clutch to prevent/control wheels spin.</DIV>

    <DIV>The lock-up is centrifugal weighted arms on the same clutch pack as before but with really light weight springs. This is to make it slip on purpose then as wheel speed comes up makes the arms apply force to the pack to make it stop slipping. All manner of lock-ups that have spring loaded counter balanced arms to prevent these from working earlier to make multiple stages. This is if say a single stage spins say a few feet out with the weight needed to not slip at peak revs.</DIV>

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southaven Ms.
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    I was having problems on a friends Busa, the clutch was grabbing too hard andmy 60' times had gotten pretty shabby and my launches were inconsistant. This a stockbike/ stock wheelbase. I tried doing this and the clutch engagement became much smoother. I stacked two steels and two fibers together. It essentually reduces the number of plates making contactbut keeps your stack height. It doesn't work like a lock-up but it may help you.If your clutch is engaging smoothly this won't really help you.
    RWEracing

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    United States
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    It really needs a welded inner or one of Brock Davidsons specials. It is that two piece deal that makes it chatter.

  5. #5
    I would buy a modified stock one, they work just as well and cost a fraction of what a aftermarket one does. You need this piece, your changing plates around will result in ruining something. Once you start losing fibers off of plates and don't change your oil everytime you take your bike out your oil pump will suck the fibers up into the screen on the inlet and you will ruin rods, crank , trans bearings, everything. Over a $50.00 piece. sonicrete's statement is of course correct, the aftermarket piece is very pricey VS $50.00Edited by: 2bking1320
    It's not bragging if you can do it. Fear None-Respect Few

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2003
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    United States
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    Anyway it is the inner causing the chatter regardless of how you fix it. Interchanging the fibers around is not a good way.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Southaven Ms.
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    It has the clutch mod and brocks clutch cushion. It wasn't chattering it would grab shortly after launch, about 30' out. The problem actually appears to be the torsion springs in the back of the clutch basket. The springs are wore out allowing the basket to rotate on the gear after launch. I do understand what your saying and agree it's not the proper fix, but it did work and the clutch still holds good, it's not burning the clutches anymore thana standard set-up. If your racing the oil needs to be changed regularly, launching a street bike especially a stock wheelbase you get a lot of clutch fibers in the oil.
    RWEracing

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southaven Ms.
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    As Sonicrete and bking1320 said it's not the proper way to improve your launch, it will help in clinch but it's not the longterm solution.
    RWEracing

  9. #9
    Haven't talked about this for awhile but if you'll soften your shock up by turning the compression + rebound screws that in turn with your clutch will help more then you would ever think. If you were to buy a actual racing shock that has more adjustment would make even more of a difference. But with stock wheelbase a stock shock should do, if you have a Gen II Busa just get a Gen I shock which has a lighter spring rate and will also help a bunch. A stock shock softened up with a extended or longer swingarm works pretty good if you don't want to spend the money since the shock has more leverage.
    It's not bragging if you can do it. Fear None-Respect Few

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